1. Home
  2. >>
  3. news
  4. >>
  5. Game teaches you how to create Fake News on the Internet, to protect yourself from them in real life

Game teaches you how to create Fake News on the Internet, to protect yourself from them in real life



Game teaches you how to create Fake News on the Internet, to protect yourself from them in real life


Fake News is part of our daily lives, in one way or another. With false news planted on social networks and blogs out there, regardless of the objective of gaining views with absurd news, or with the political aim of destabilizing someone saying things that are not true, today we must pay close attention to what we are reading, to know if in fact such information is real.

With that, members of the Cambridge Social Decision-Making Lab and the media group Drop created a game, called bad news, with the aim of teaching players about such false news and the disinformation it brings. The game will give you a small account on Twitter and it will encourage you to grow followers by feeding them fear and anger, common elements linked to fake news, while at the same time dealing with critics who accuse you of spreading the lies. You also need to confuse issues that are real with conspiracy theories, another tactic used by these people.

You win in the game as you can destroy the quality of online conversations, for your own gain, and lose when they get you sidelined, beating you in the debate, or traveling too far on ideas and generating very fanciful content. the game values ​​the search for clicks and views, common to “practitioners” of sharing false news. Or have you never seen such a person begging for sharing or retwitting?

It doesn’t matter if you want to attack the left or the right, you just choose “your side of the force” and go mercilessly attacking the opposite side, as both sides have people who love spreading false news. We don’t need to go too deep in research to find a lot of cases, regardless of people’s political orientations.

Game creators describe bad news as a way to vaccinate people against misinformation. “The idea is that once you’ve seen the tactics, and used them in the game, you build endurance,” said the director of Cambridge Social Decision-Making Lab, Sander van der Linden to The Guardian. Some of these tactics are specific, such as a small lack of errors in handling the Twitter of a big account to represent it. Others are broader, such as those that are attractive to negative emotions.

Via (The Verge)